High Desert State Prison/California Correctional Center Honor Guard and with Honor Guard representatives from the California Highway Patrol, Lassen County Sheriff’s Department and the Susanville Police Department.

High Desert State Prison/California Correctional Center Honor Guard and with Honor Guard representatives from the California Highway Patrol, Lassen County Sheriff’s Department and the Susanville Police Department.

Two state prisons pitch in for Crime Victims’ Rights Week

By Lt. Gregory Crowe, AA/Public Information Officer
High Desert State Prison

Lassen Family Service’s second Walk a Mile in Their Shoes event was held on April 25.

Melissa Downing, Executive Director of Lassen Family Services, speaks during the event.

Melissa Downing, Executive Director of Lassen Family Services, speaks during the event.

The event, part of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, included testimony by a survivor of domestic abuse, recognition of the Empathy in Education award winner, a chili cook-off, informational booths and a mile-long walk.

The event was sponsored by the Lassen Family Services and hosted representatives from all over the county.

The flag ceremony was conducted by the High Desert State Prison/California Correctional Center Honor Guard, with help from the Honor Guard representatives from the California Highway Patrol, Lassen County Sheriff’s Department and the Susanville Police Department.

Did you know?

1965
• The first crime victim compensation program is established in California.
• By 1970, five additional compensation programs are created in New York, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Maryland, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

1975
• The first “Victims’ Rights Week” is organized by the Philadelphia District Attorney.
• Citizen activists from across the country unite to expand victim services and increase recognition of victims’ rights through the formation of the National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA).

1980
• Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is founded after the death of 13-year-old Cari Lightner, who was killed by a repeat drunk-driving offender. The first two MADD chapters are established in Sacramento, California, and Annapolis, Maryland.
• Congress passes the Parental Kidnapping Prevention Act of 1980.

2000
• Congress passes a new national drunk driving limit of 0.08 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) with the support of MADD, other victim advocacy organizations, and leading highway safety, health, medical, law enforcement, and insurance groups. The law, passed with bipartisan support, requires states to pass 0.08 “per se intoxication” laws or lose a portion of their annual federal highway funding.

(Editor’s note: Some websites may not be accessible from a CDCR computer.)

Read the full list of important dates, https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2015/pdf/Landmarks.pdf

Learn more about National Crime Victims’ Rights week, https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw/