From left are Steve Marshall, Parole Administrator; Parole Agent III Erin Peel; Brenda Crowding, Parole Administrator; and Jeff Green, Associate Director.

From left are Steve Marshall, Parole Administrator; Parole Agent III Erin Peel; Brenda Crowding, Parole Administrator; and Jeff Green, Associate Director.

Parole Administrator Brenda Crowding, Agent III Erin Peel honored

By Steve Marshall, Parole Administrator
Division of Adult Parole Operations, Electronic Monitoring Unit/Sex Offender Unit 

Two of the Division of Adult Parole Operation’s (DAPO) finest were recently awarded the prestigious Fay Honey Knopp award.

Parole Administrator Brenda Crowding and Parole Agent III Erin K. Peel, with the DAPO Sex Offender Unit, received plaques in recognition of their influential contributions to CDCR’s Sex Offender Management Program.  Their tireless efforts in the development of policies and procedures, establishment of sex offender treatment contracts and implementation of DAPO’s statewide containment model will have a long term effect on making California citizens safer by decreasing sexual offending and victimization.

The awards were presented during the California Coalition on Sexual Offending’s (CCOSO) 18th Annual Training Conference in Monterey. Brenda Crowding was also the keynote speaker for the conference. Attendees included representatives from DAPO, county probation agencies, local law enforcement agencies, sex offender treatment programs and clinicians, and other stakeholders in the sex offender treatment modality.

The annual awards program was established to recognize individuals, organizations and agencies that demonstrated excellence and sustained dedication to the field of sexual offender treatment. Originally called the Vista Award, the first award was presented in 1987 to Sen. John Seymour of the California legislature for his work and support of sex offender treatment. The award was renamed in 1995 in honor of Fay Honey Knopp, an activist, pioneer, innovator and visionary in the treatment of sexual offending work throughout the United States.

The work of Administrator Crowding and Parole Agent III Peel recently garnered positive coverage in stories across the country.

The Washington Times:

For the first time, California will make paroled sex offenders take periodic lie detector tests as a way to gauge their behavior patterns and perhaps prevent new sex crimes.

The American Bar Association Magazine:

The results can’t be used against them in court, but they can be used in investigations of new crimes or parole violations. 

The Orange County Register:

All sex offender parolees also are required to participate in specially designed treatment programs. Previously, only high-risk offenders had to do that.

NBC in San Diego:

Research shows the combined steps have the best chance of preventing new crimes, reducing new offenses by 40 percent, said Janet Neeley, a deputy attorney general who commented on behalf of the Sex Offender Management Board.