Unlocking History: Visionary wardens get creative to foster education, part 3

Today’s rehabilitative efforts in the state prison system can be traced back to the early days of the department. More than a century ago, visionary wardens pushed for job training, education and family engagement so former inmates could reintegrate back into society after being released from prison. Like the definition of visionary, these leaders implemented original ideas and planned the future with “imagination or wisdom.” This series takes a closer look at some of these wardens and their contributions to shaping what would become today’s CDCR. This is the third part in the series.

CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety hits streets in Merced County gang raids

CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety assisted in a broad, predawn anti-gang sweep on May 10, culminating in the seizure of the largest amount of firearms in Merced County’s history, and nabbing more than 60 gang members who are facing serious criminal charges. The operation also involved searches at 10 prisons and the cooperation of Crisis Response Teams to serve search and arrest warrants.

Unlocking History: Visionary wardens introduced dental care, sought to combat addiction, part 2

Today’s rehabilitative efforts in the state prison system can be traced back to the early days of the department. More than a century ago, visionary wardens pushed for job training, education and family engagement so former inmates could reintegrate back into society after being released from prison. Like the definition of visionary, these leaders implemented original ideas and planned the future with “imagination or wisdom.” This series takes a closer look at some of these wardens and their contributions to shaping what would become today’s CDCR. This is the second part in the series.

Unlocking History: Visionary wardens geared prisons toward rehabilitation, part 1

Today’s rehabilitative efforts in the state prison system can be traced back to the early days of the department. More than a century ago, visionary wardens pushed for job training, education and family engagement so former inmates could reintegrate back into society after being released from prison. Like the definition of visionary, these leaders implemented original ideas and planned the future with “imagination or wisdom.” This series takes a closer look at some of these wardens and their contributions to shaping what would become today’s CDCR. This is the first part in the series.

Fundraiser aims to help disadvantaged youth in memory of sergeant’s son

Purchasing school supplies can be difficult for families already struggling just to keep a roof over their heads and food on the table. This is why staff at California Medical Facility (CMF), through a non-profit organization, have rallied to help. The organization helps keep alive the memory of a young man gunned down in a local neighborhood in 2005. Their next fundraiser is May 12.

CMF staff help broaden reach of Special Olympics fundraisers

The Special Olympics organization holds special meaning for Christopher Tileston, a correctional administrator at California Medical Facility. It’s why he puts in extra effort to hold fundraising events in the greater Sacramento area. After a long work day, Tileston recently drove from Vacaville to Chili’s restaurant in Roseville for a Tip-A-Cop event he helped organize. It was the second such event for Tileston in April.

Unlocking History: 1922 San Quentin Women’s Ward report sheds light on 48 inmates

A yellowed, typed spreadsheet titled “Report of Inmates, Women’s Ward, San Quentin Prison, May 1922” gives some insight into the 48 women serving sentences at the time. In 1922, there were two state prisons – San Quentin and Folsom. Female inmates were housed at San Quentin before the original California Institution for Women was built. One name stands out in the report: Emma Le Doux, the infamous “trunk murderess.”