SCC, law partners raise $6k for Special Olympics

SCC, law partners raise $6k for Special Olympics

Sierra Conservation Center (SCC) staff recently showed up strong for a Tip-A-Cop event held at Applebee’s Restaurant in Sonora. Both SCC custody staff and non-custody staff along with the Sonora Police Department, Tuolumne County Sherriff and California Highway Patrol waited tables with Special Olympic Athletes, raising over $6,000 to support our local Special Olympians.

Counselors, parole services associates gather for rehabilitation-focused conference

Counselors, parole services associates gather for rehabilitation-focused conference

On Oct. 2, Division of Rehabilitative Programs (DRP) Director Brant Choate gathered all DRP Correctional Counselor IIIs (CC III), Correctional Counselor II-Specialists (CC II) and Parole Services Associates (PSA) at the Richard A. McGee Correctional Training Facility in Galt for a two-day conference.  This marked the first time since DRP expanded rehabilitative programs into every prison that these employees attended a conference together.

Bay Area reentry event empowers 68 female parolees with DAPO support

Bay Area reentry event empowers 68 female parolees with DAPO support

Jasmine Washington lifted the lapels of her sleek blazer and boldly strutted between rows of fellow women parolees at the Southeast Community Facility in San Francisco on Oct. 24. Surrounded by 67 of her peers, representatives from 56 local resource service providers and supportive Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO) staff from the Adult Programs Unit (APU), Washington displayed her own empowerment just as sharply as she did her new suit ― courtesy of Dress for Success.

Unlocking History: Early prison doctor brought San Quentin into 20th century

Unlocking History: Early prison doctor brought San Quentin into 20th century

In 1913, Woodrow Wilson became the 28th President of the United States and the Ford Motor Company instituted the world’s first moving assembly line to crank out its Model T. Meanwhile at San Quentin, 27-year-old Dr. Leo Stanley was appointed resident physician. He served as the San Quentin resident physician from 1913 until 1951, only leaving for a brief time to serve in World War II. When he retired in 1951, Harry S. Truman was in the White House, the Korean War was raging and America was tuning in to watch the first episode of “I Love Lucy.”