Unlocking History: State creates new agency for young offenders, part 4

Unlocking History: State creates new agency for young offenders, part 4

Institutions for young offenders sparked the need for more oversight, resulting in the creation of the California Youth Authority, which eventually became the Division of Juvenile Justice. When females were just breaking through barriers to become correctional officers in male prisons, a woman was named to head the youth authority in 1976. It’s believed she was the first woman in the nation to lead a statewide prison system. The is the fourth and final part in the series.

Unlocking History: Whittier, Preston youth reform schools open doors, part 3

Unlocking History: Whittier, Preston youth reform schools open doors, part 3

With the closure of the two previous reform schools in San Francisco and Marysville, the state established two new schools using what were considered modern approaches at the time. One school was opened in the southern part of the state and the other in the north. In this installment of the evolution of the state’s efforts to reform young offenders, Inside CDCR takes a closer look at those schools and their incarcerated wards.

Unlocking History: State prisons evolve to handle young offenders, part 1

Unlocking History: State prisons evolve to handle young offenders, part 1

Prior to the creation of a juvenile justice system, young offenders were sentenced much like their adult counterparts. At one time, young offenders could be sentenced to hard labor. Crimes committed by youth ranged from murder to theft but without alternatives to state prison, most ended up in San Quentin or Folsom. We look at some of those early offenders and the crimes that landed them in the state’s two oldest prisons. Even after the creation of reform schools, it look years for the courts to catch on to the concept. This first installment looks at those early offenders and their stories.