Unlocking History: Early inmates included a movie fan, actors turned bandits

Unlocking History: Early inmates included a movie fan, actors turned bandits

Those who walk the toughest beat in the state deal with people who made very poor choices. From car thieves to those facing insurmountable medical debt, the reasons some of those early inmates landed in state prisons are varied. The following inmates, who served their time in the early 1900s, range from actors who turned to crime and a movie fan who emulated the silver screen’s cowboy bandits to another inmate who turned his prison experiences into a play to urge reform.

Unlocking History: Farmer-turned-warden fosters agriculture at Folsom prison

Unlocking History: Farmer-turned-warden fosters agriculture at Folsom prison

In the 1880s, John Joseph Smith worked on his father’s farm, but seeing a low return on investment, he decided farming wasn’t in his future. The 21-year-old Smith set off to try a different career path – the state prison system. The farm boy was the youngest officer in the state prison system in 1889. He eventually worked his way up to become warden. In all, he had 37 years of state service when he left in 1927.

Unlocking History: Silent screen stars give voice to inmate rehabilitation

Unlocking History: Silent screen stars give voice to inmate rehabilitation

Mary Pickford was known as “America’s Sweetheart,” often cast in roles far younger than her years. The silent screen star was regularly in the headlines for founding her own film company, later creating United Artists and volunteering to help civilian efforts during the first two world wars. Somehow, the highest-paid actress in the country also found time to entertain inmates at San Quentin. She was one of many who were vocal in their support for rehabilitation.

Unlocking History: Incarcerated Civil War veteran helps others earn parole

Unlocking History: Incarcerated Civil War veteran helps others earn parole

Joseph Wess Moore was a 15-year-old farm boy who joined the Union Army to fight in the Civil War. Decades later, he found himself sitting in San Quentin serving a life sentence for murder. While incarcerated, he fell in love with literature and the stories that could take him beyond the walls of the prison. Soon he put pen to paper to craft his own tales, publishing some of his writings in a small book used to promote prison reform.

Unlocking History: Early prison doctor brought San Quentin into 20th century

Unlocking History: Early prison doctor brought San Quentin into 20th century

In 1913, Woodrow Wilson became the 28th President of the United States and the Ford Motor Company instituted the world’s first moving assembly line to crank out its Model T. Meanwhile at San Quentin, 27-year-old Dr. Leo Stanley was appointed resident physician. He served as the San Quentin resident physician from 1913 until 1951, only leaving for a brief time to serve in World War II. When he retired in 1951, Harry S. Truman was in the White House, the Korean War was raging and America was tuning in to watch the first episode of “I Love Lucy.”

Unlocking History: After 35 years, you can hear Preston School band

Unlocking History: After 35 years, you can hear Preston School band

Arts have long played a major role in rehabilitation efforts of California’s offenders and music is no exception. A vinyl recording titled “Sacramento, City of Camellias” is one such example. Published in 1983 by Danmar Co., the record features the Mother Lode Band of the now-shuttered Preston School of Industry in Ione.